Quinnipiac Meadows

Urban Bird Research at Quinnipiac Meadows

By: 
Alanis Allen

As the world becomes increasingly urbanized with an estimated 60% of the world population living in cities by 2030, we have to ask ourselves: what effect is this having on wildlife? All animals that live near cities experience phenomena such as traffic noise and artificial light at night. Birds specifically have been known to change their behaviors and physiological traits in response to urbanization.

New Haven's Newest IBA

By: 
Arabelle Schoenberg

Quinnipiac Meadows Nature Preserve was declared New Haven's newest IBA last week! IBA stands for Important Bird Area and it is a classification given by the Audubon Society to natural areas, both urban and rural, that are considered important for the conservation of at-risk bird populations. Audubon CT approved the addition of Quinnipiac Meadows Preserve to the pre-existing Quinnipiac Tidal Marsh IBA, which spans over 900 acres of marshland along the Quinnipiac River in New Haven, North Haven, and Hamden. 

Working to End Waterfowl Hunting along the Quinnipiac River

By: 
Arabelle Schoenberg

In the early mornings, some neighbors of the Quinnipiac Meadows Nature Preserve hear gunshots. Currently, hunting is legal along the Quinnipiac River as long as all shooting happens north of the boundary line extending from Grannis Island (on the southernmost tip of the preserve) to Lombard Street on the other side of the river. The hunting boundary was moved up to this point in 2009 in response to safety concerns for families living nearby.

Quinnipiac Meadows Educational Signs

By: 
Max Farbman

As readers of this blog and visitors to the Long Wharf Nature Preserve probably know, the Land Trust – with the help of our partners, supporters, and dedicated volunteers – was able to install brand new educational signs in the Long Wharf Nature Preserve last summer. However, what they might not know is that a similar makeover will soon be occurring at our Quinnipiac Meadows Nature Preserve. Again thanks to our generous supporters, partners, and volunteers, the Land Trust will soon be installing eight new educational signs in Quinnipiac Meadows.

Early birds may get the worm - but early birders get the coffee!

By: 
Olivia Pearman

The Early Birders got coffee and snacks this morning but that's not what got them up to visit Quinnipiac Meadows at 8 am. It was a beautiful morning for birding and we were rewarded with the chance to see 30 different bird species and about 200 individuals! Check out eBird to see the list of everything we saw this morning. Bill Batsford of the New Haven Bird Club led the walk through the preserve and was kind enough to set up his scope so we could get a better view.

Bats Are Friends, Not Pests!

By: 
Olivia Pearman

Did you know bats can live for about 35 years? Did you also know that bat populations are being wiped out by a disease called the White-nose Syndrome? With this bat box installed at the Quinnipiac Meadows Nature Preserve, we hope to boost bat populations in the area and spark conversations about these important creatures that we have been rapidly losing over the last several years.